King George, fans call him.  And why not?  Shoot, Strait has enjoyed a longer reign than most of the Georges who ruled England.  King George I was going strong at 24 years until he was arrested and beheaded. King George III ruled, under various titles, for more than 40 years, but he went blind and insane after three decades.

Strait's rule of the country charts appears to be considerably steadier. Perhaps that's because in a climate where country music owes greatly to the power of the music video and pop inspiration, Strait remains a steadfast traditionalist. Of his major-label, arena-level contemporaries, only Alan Jackson shares an old-school country cast that even approximates Strait's music.

The Texas honky-tonk inspirations that Strait embraced after an initial fascination with rock 'n' roll in his youth still abound in his music today -- specifically, artists, including Bob Wills and Merle Haggard, who knew how to champion country's rhythmic high spirits, its blue-collar integrity and its deepest brushes with the blues.  The same holds true for the Ace in the Hole Band, the Central Texas ensemble that Strait joined 32 years ago when it advertised for a lead singer.  It remains his backup band today.   That's how little has changed.

Commercialism always has been an odd fit for Strait. In 1992, when Billy Ray Cyrus commanded country with a mullet and a pop confection called Achy Breaky Heart, Strait rolled out a feature film called Pure Country, in which he a played a glitzy singer with a curious haircut and a huge identity crisis.  It's wasn't a half-bad little movie.

In real life, Strait is one of the few country singers without a significant crossover hit.  He also remains, even through this year, without any wins at the Grammy Awards.
But that has not diminished his country kingdom one bit.  Late last fall came another anthology, a sampler of tunes that just missed the top of the charts. Its cover art was a near replica of 50 Number Ones, and its title was an affirmative sequel: 22 More Hits.

There he goes with the numbers again. But how amazing it is that amid these also-rans is Amarillo by Morning, a calming, contemplative single of Western grace from early in Strait's career.  Most country acts would kill for this sort of song, or they wouldn't know the power of it if it hit them sideways.  Here, it's just one of many badges of honor that Strait gets to show off in performances that remain as unassuming as the music that propels them.

Kenny Chesney makes his stage entrance these days on a platform that sails over the crowd. Tim McGraw shoots out of the stage floor.  
Strait, to this day, walks on stage as if he were being invited into your living room.

That's the kind of king this King George is. Long may he reign.







TROUBADOUR REVIEWS/INTERVIEWS



Nashville, Tenn. (March 27, 2008) – George Strait, widely known as the “King of Country Music,” continues to raise the standard and follows up his CMA Album of the Year, It Just Comes Natural, with Troubadour, Strait’s 37th album to be released April 1st.  From a numerical view, the album’s first single, “I Saw God Today,” already set a personal mark when it debuted at No. 19 on the country radio charts—higher than any other song he’s released in his career. Currently it sits at #4 on R&R/Billboard.

“It’s a great record to start it out with,” says Strait. “Anyone who has had a kid can relate to seeing them for the first time and know that it is really and truly is a gift from God.”

From a creative vantage point, the album as a whole is remarkable. Strait explores new musical turf with the calypso R&B in “River Of Love”; opens up to meaningful—and rare—guest appearances by Patty Loveless, Vince Gill and songwriter pal Dean Dillon; and delivers the 12-song set with a voice that continues an extremely graceful evolution.

“He’s always good,” co-producer Tony Brown says, “but he sang really good on this album.”

“His vocal tone has progressed very, very nicely in the last five or six years,” observes Dillon, who should know: He’s written 13 of Strait’s hits, dating back to the first, 1981’s “Unwound.”

Strait recorded for the second time, at Jimmy Buffett’s Shrimpboat Sound in Key West - A beat-up shack on the waterfront that used to be a shrimp storage cooler.

“We were all havin’ fun, which I think shows in the tracks,” Brown says of the sessions. “In the beginning, we went to Shrimpboat on a whim. This time we went back because the last album turned out so awesome. I have a funny feelin’ we’ll be goin’ back again.”

As always, Troubadour is a mix of the playful and the profound. The breezy energies get tapped in the restless, workin’-man tribute “Brothers Of The Highway”; the romantic vacation piece “When You’re In Love”; the slightly funky “River Of Love”; and the snappy honky-tonker “Make Her Fall In Love With Me Song.”

Strait also unleashes his deeper nature in the career-reflective title track, featuring backing vocals by label-mate Vince Gill; “House With No Doors,” a clever-but-wise reminder to the control freak in everyone; a pair of spiritually themed tracks, the eye-opening “I Saw God Today” and the subdued “Give Me More Time”; and “If Heartaches Were Horses,” a cinematic conclusion to the album.

“That West Texas Town” has a surprising twist by making the song a duet with Dillon, a nod to a songwriter who’s had a steady role in Strait’s career.

“I’ve always liked Dean as a singer,” says Strait. “And so I got to thinking ‘man you know it would be great to have him sing a song with me.’"

“House Of Cash,” featuring Patty Loveless’ powerful harmonic blend, puts a mountain-bred stamp on the passing of Johnny Cash and June Carter, and pays tribute to the Man In Black’s historic impact.

“When I heard it I immediately thought of Patty,” says Strait. “I’ve always thought she was one of the greatest female country singers that we have out there. It sounded just exactly like I thought it would - she nailed it.”

“George is real,” Loveless says, “and anything that’s real, it stays around. His music: It just comes out there effortlessly.”

Remarkable describes the continuing development of George Strait, who’s written a personal history so unique he’s creating new, record-breaking plateaus that have simply never been reached before. He is currently nominated for ACM Entertainer of the Year for the 10th time and has the distinct honor of XM Radio dedicating an entire channel to his music during the next two months. “Strait Country” will be available from April 1 through May 31 on XM channel 17 and also available on online (http://xmro. xmradio.com).

His last album, It Just Comes Natural, was so solid that it brought him the CMA honor for Album of the Year, an award he’s won four different times and in three different decades.

He already owns the all-time record for the most No. 1 singles in any genre. He has more career nominations than any other artist in both the Nashville-based Country Music Association awards and the California-bred Academy of Country Music honors. He has more gold and platinum albums than any other country artist.

And the “King of Country Music” joined the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2006, making him the only performer who’s earned a plaque in the hallowed halls while still consistently racking up hits.

With an enviable consistency, Strait continues to sell out arenas and to stretch himself creatively with an album, Troubadour, which stands among the best in a career already filled with highlights. And he does so while all the while holding a permanent place on the country radio dial.

“Troubadour…you know it does tell a pretty good story that fits my whole career from start to finish,” admits Strait. “cause that’s really what I’ll be when I grow to an age I can’t do this anymore. I’ve always wanted to be around as long as I could for sure. I’m still after longevity. I want to make records as long as I can cause I still enjoy it just as much as I always did.”






GEORGE STRAIT’S TROUBADOUR DEBUTS AT #1 ON BILLBOARD 200 AND TOP COUNTRY ALBUMS CHART


Nashville, TN (April 9, 2008) The “King of Country Music’s” 37th album, Troubadour, debuted at #1 today on the Billboard 200 and the Top Country Albums chart.

This is the third time in Strait’s career that a new album has debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200 chart and the 11th time debuting at #1 on the Top Country Albums chart.

Currently, George Strait has 32 platinum albums (13 of which are multi-platinum). The only recording artists with more RIAA certified platinum albums are The Beatles with 39 and Elvis Presley with 45.

It makes perfect sense that Entertainment Weekly proclaims, “George Strait is the most reliable record-maker and biggest one-man hit factory in any genre of music.” In addition, The Dallas Morning News reports, “Few artists, country or otherwise, have remained so consistent for so long. George Strait is a treasured rarity.”

With a career that spans more than 25 years, Strait has sold more than 67 million records and counting. He has received more than 50 major entertainment industry awards and countless nominations. In 2006, Strait was elected into the Country Music Hall of Fame, one of the few artists to receive such a distinction while still actively recording and producing music.

He is currently nominated for ACM Entertainer of the Year for the 10th time and has the distinct honor of XM Radio dedicating an entire channel to his music during the next two months. 'Strait Country' will be available from April 1 through May 31 on XM channel 17 and also available on online (http://xmro.xmradio.com).





NEW YORK (April 9) - For the fourth time in his career, country veteran George Strait earned the No. 1 spot on the U.S. pop album chart Wednesday, while R.E.M. scored its highest sales and charting week in nearly 12 years.

Strait's "Troubadour" sold 166,000 copies in the week ended April 6, according to Nielsen SoundScan. The Billboard 200 has hosted at least one new entry from Strait every year since 1984. The MCA Nashville album also ranks as his 22nd No. 1 Billboard's Top Country Albums tally.



Album Review: George Strait's 'Troubadour’
By Patrick Luce From Monsters and Critics.com

George Strait’s ‘Troubadour’ demonstrates why the singer is the very definition of country music. The album is filled with the classic country sound that has made Strait one of the genres brightest stars, and lets fans know he has no plans of fading.

The 12-track album kicks off with the title song – which is the perfect beginning and seems to sum up Strait’s entire career in country music. “It Was Me,” “When You’re In Love,” “House With No Doors,” and “River of Love” feature the classic Strait sound and fit comfortably in his catalog of music.

Strait pays tribute to country music icon Johnny Cash and his wife June Carter Cash with the bluesy “House of Cash.” The track (a duet with singer Patty Loveless) chronicles the night Cash’s house caught on fire, but also describes how country music lost two of its cornerstones with June’s and Johnny’s death.

Strait gets spiritual with “I saw God Today” and emotional with “If Heartaches Were Horses” and “Give Me More Time” (one of my favorite tracks on the album).

He lets his “honky tonk” side show with “Brothers of the Highway,” “West Texas Town” (a duet with Dean Dillon), and “Make Her Fall in Love with Me Song” (my other favorite song on the album).

Without a doubt Strait is one of country music’s greatest performers, and ‘Troubadour’ is filled with examples of what gives him the right to claim that title.

Every song on ‘Troubadour’ is a hit, and the album is easy to recommend to any Strait fan or anyone who enjoys real country music.




*  NASHVILLE, Tenn., April 21/PRNewswire/
-- George Strait, The King of Country Music, has more #1 hits in a single chart format than any other recording artist, including all genres of music.

As "I Saw God Today" sits at the #1 spot on Billboard/R&R, one should take notice that it's been a great few weeks for George Strait. His 37th album, Troubadour, debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200 chart and now he has an unprecedented total of 56 #1 singles to his name.

"I would just like to say thanks to all my fans out there," says Strait. "To have a number one record is very special, whether it's your first or one of many. 'I Saw God Today' is a beautifully written song which reaches very tender places in many people's hearts. I would like to thank Rodney Clawson, Monty Criswell, and Wade Kirby and congratulate them on the success of their efforts in writing this great song. God Bless You All."

Luke Lewis, Chairman of UMG Nashville, states, "All of us at Universal Music Group are proud to be associated with George Strait. It is a privilege to work with him at a time when his work has put him in the Hall Of Fame and he continues to shatter every record in the book."

"George Strait is one of music's most consistent hitmakers for a reason -- he knows a hit song when he hears one and he only sings it if it fits him," reports Billboard Magazine and Entertainment Weekly proclaims, "George Strait is the most reliable record-maker and biggest one-man hit factory in any genre of music." USA Today calls Strait a "Singer's Singer" and Rolling Stone says, "the hit single 'I Saw God Today' is one example of why folks call Strait 'King George' -- although this monarch is a uniter, not a divider."





Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

George Strait's greatest attribute is his consistency. It's not just how he rarely delivers a bad album but how his music remains rooted in pure Texas honky tonk, a fact that makes his reliably excellent music all the more remarkable. Sometimes Strait steps beyond reliable and delivers something close to transcendent, and 2006's nothing-but-the-basics It Just Comes Natural was one of those times. Playing exclusively to his strengths, the album was lean and strong, yet another hit under his belt, and more than earning its honors as the CMA's Album of the Year. It would be tempting for most artists to turn out another album just like the last but Strait isn't like most artists, as his 2008 follow-up, Troubadour, gracefully illustrates.

Troubadour finds Strait turning introspective, getting softer and mellower, perhaps even slightly melancholy, yet it's a comforting melancholy, as the album never wallows in sadness — there are plenty of Texas 2-steps, breezy mid-tempo tunes, and love songs to temper the blue moments here. Nevertheless, Strait is the troubadour of the title, a musician who bears the scars of the road and is a richer singer for it. This is especially evident on Troubadour, as it has a warm, burnished sound suited for his gently weathered voice, and its 12 songs are by and large exceptionally crafted and deceptively simple; they're songs that benefit greatly from Strait's casual virtuosity.

As always, he has his pick of the best songsmiths — Dean Dillon, Robert Earl Keen, Al Anderson, Buddy Cannon, Monty Holmes, and Scotty Emerick are among the writers bearing credits here — and he has an unerring ability to pick songs that suit his strengths and weave together to form a cohesive whole (the only minor misstep being a too-anthemic tribute to Johnny Cash, "House of Cash"). Here, the mood is subdued, with even the lighter numbers not quite breaking a sweat, but that's the charm of Troubadour: in its relaxed, intimate way it recalls Merle Haggard's quieter, story-heavy albums of the early '70s, only with Strait's signature, unhurried attitude, a trait that only grows more attractive over the years.







TROUBADOUR BIO

Remarkable.

It’s the best word to describe the continuing development of George Strait, who’s written a personal history so unique he’s creating new, record-breaking plateaus that have simply never been reached before.

He already owns the all-time record for the most No. 1 singles in any genre. He has more career nominations than any other artist in both the Nashville-based Country Music Association awards and the California-bred Academy of Country Music honors. He has more gold and platinum albums than any other country artist.

His last album, It Just Comes Natural, was so solid that it brought him the CMA honor for Album of the Year, an award he’s won four different times and in three different decades.

And the “King of Country Music” joined the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2006, making him the only performer who’s earned a plaque in the hallowed halls while still consistently racking up hits. With Troubadour, Strait’s 35th album, he continues to raise the standard. From a numerical view, the album’s first single, “I Saw God Today,” already set a personal mark when it debuted at No. 19 on the country radio charts—higher than any other song he’s released in his career.

From a creative vantage point, the album as a whole is, again, remarkable. Strait explores new musical turf with the calypso R&B in “River Of Love”; opens up to meaningful—and rare—guest appearances by Patty Loveless, Vince Gill and songwriter pal Dean Dillon; and delivers the 12-song set with a voice that continues an extremely graceful evolution.

“He’s always good,” co-producer Tony Brown says, “but he sang really good on this album.”

“His vocal tone has progressed very, very nicely in the last five or six years,” observes Dillon, who should know: One of Strait’s golfing and fishing compadres, he’s written 13 of Strait’s hits, dating back to the first, 1981’s “Unwound.”  “He’s got a real mellow thing goin’ with his voice right now.”

Troubadour benefits from Strait’s uncanny ability to balance organization and spontaneity. He and Brown, who has overseen Strait projects since the Pure Country soundtrack in 1992, spend much of the year amassing potential songs, and as one of the genre’s pre-eminent artists, Strait has the opportunity to select from the very best.  Still, the albums aren’t mapped out precisely. He and Brown literally determine which titles they intend to work on the morning of a given session, following the day’s creative muse.

That was even easier on Troubadour as Strait recorded, for the second time, at Jimmy Buffett’s Shrimpboat Sound in Key West. A beat-up shack on the waterfront that used to be a shrimp storage cooler where boats would deposit the day’s catch, the studio is so small that they pulled a Ryder truck up to the back door to provide an isolation booth for the electric guitarist’s amplifier.

Strait first recorded there when he sang on Buffett’s award-nominated event “Hey, Good Lookin’,” and he fell in love with the place. Removed from the day-to-day concerns in Nashville—the home for most of the session players, who Strait affectionately refers to as “the Critters”—there’s a free quality about the studio and its setting that appeals to the singer

“We were all havin’ fun, which I think shows in the tracks,” Brown says of the sessions. “In the beginning, we went to Shrimpboat on a whim. This time we went back because the last album turned out so awesome. I have a funny feelin’ we’ll be goin’ back again.”

As always, Troubadour is a mix of the playful and the profound. The breezy energies get tapped in the restless, workin’-man tribute “Brothers Of The Highway”; the romantic vacation piece “When You’re In Love”; the slightly funky “River Of Love”; and the snappy honky-tonker “Make Her Fall In Love With Me Song.”

Strait also unleashes his deeper nature in the career-reflective title track, featuring backing vocals by label-mate Vince Gill; “House With No Doors,” a clever-but-wise reminder to the control freak in everyone; a pair of spiritually themed tracks, the eye-opening “I Saw God Today” and the subdued “Give Me More Time”; and “If Heartaches Were Horses,” a cinematic conclusion to the album.

“That West Texas Town” has a surprising twist by making the song a duet with Dillon, it also provides a nod to a songwriter who’s had a steady role in Strait’s career, turning out such familiar titles as “Ocean Front Property,” “I’ve Come To Expect It From You,” “The Chair” and “She Let Herself Go.”

“House Of Cash,” featuring Loveless’ powerful harmonic blend, puts a mountain-bred harmonic stamp on the passing of Johnny Cash and June Carter, using the tragic destruction of their Middle Tennessee home in a 2007 blaze and the name of Cash’s former recording studio to pay tribute to the Man In Black’s historic impact.

That Strait continues to fold subtle new wrinkles into an already-unparalleled career as a hit-maker is a testament to his still-burning passion for his art.

Born and raised in Texas, he grew up on a ranch and earned an agricultural degree at Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos. He fronted a band during a tenure with the Army, then found his voice in 1975 when he teamed up with a honky-tonk ensemble, the germination of what has become his Ace In The Hole touring band.

Even after he was heralded as a flag-bearing figure for traditional country music, Strait eschewed traditional career paths: He refused to move to Nashville, and—instead of sacrificing big chunks of his personal life to pursue his job—he works his touring and recording schedule around his time at home with Norma, to whom he’s been married since 1971, and around his hobbies, including hunting and rodeos. In addition, Strait hosts his own team-roping competition every spring.

That smart attention to priorities has kept him fresh and focused on the creative process and given him an almost Elvis-like mystique.

But where Presley remained an enigma through much of his career, Strait rather slyly reveals himself in small bites through his music. He’s rarely recorded anything with a specifically autobiographical storyline, yet he maintains a strict integrity about his songs, choosing only material that fits his classic vocal style and his personal beliefs. He’s been known to turn down obvious hits because he simply couldn’t agree with one line or a verse in the song.

“He’s real,” Loveless says, “and anything that’s real, it stays around. His music: It just comes out there effortlessly. It’s no hanging from the rafters, no tricks, he just comes out there and sings to people. Men appreciate him as the real deal, and women are drawn to his voice and the way he carries himself on stage. He’s such a gentleman, and he does have a great smile.”

And, of course, a career that’s consistently weathered musical trends to arrive at a place where he no longer worries about the rules of the music industry. He sets his own.

With an enviable consistency, Strait continues to sell out arenas and to stretch himself creatively with an album, Troubadour, which stands among the best in a career already filled with highlights. And he does so while all the while holding a permanent place on the country radio dial.

George Strait’s ability to balance his personal life with his business and to creatively challenge himself without error is, in a word, remarkable.








George Strait —Troubadour April 1, 2008
 
1   Troubadour
2   It Was Me
3   Brothers Of The Highway
4   River Of Love
5   House Of Cash
6   I Saw God Today
7   Give Me More Time
8   When You're In Love
9   Make Her Fall In Love With Me Song
10  West Texas Town
11  House With No Doors
12  If Heartaches Were Horses


"TROUBADOUR" was  Released April 1st, 2008



From Lexington:

By Walter Tunis of the Lexington Herald
CONTRIBUTING MUSIC WRITER

Feb. 29, 2008 -- The anthology that came out in 2004 was
crazy enough. It bore the title 50 Number Ones.

That's the sort of banner that leaves little room for error.
How high on the country charts did these tunes go?
All the way to No. 1, of course. And how many did you say
the album included? Why, 50 of them.


Fifty chart-toppers? That's insane. And we're not even
talking about a lifetime catalog. This isn't The Complete
works of Shakespeare or anything. These are prime countryhits released in a period of barely more than two decades.  And the guy responsible for them isn't even close to being done with his work.

Still, in country music circles -- in any kind of musical
endeavor, for that matter -- that's some achievement.
Such is the career of George Strait.


This page was released June 10th, 2008, last updated: September 29, 2015
Link to "Troubadour" Interview on GeorgeStrait.com
On August 8th, 2008 George released a wonderful biographical type music video for the title cut on this album - "TROUBADOUR."  This wonderful award winning video was directed by Trey Fanjoy who also directed  "Seashores of Old Mexico."






~  Texas Troubadour Wins 2 More

Nashville TN Nov.12th, 2008

– Our cowboy was dressed up, fit to kill in his sleek
black jacket and dress slacks with a white shirt that
showed off his tan beautifully. Wife Norma was
beside him as always; dressed beautifully, showing
her pride.  George performed his next single release
from “Troubadour.”

His vocals and actions in “River of Love” were smooth
and easy. He was backed up by the three writers of
the song along with his own background singers, and
his great Ace in the Hole Band. 

George won Single of the Year for “I Saw God Today” and Album of the Year for “Troubadour” making him the act with the most awards in CMA history with 22. 

That smile on his face made my night. I whooped it up when he won album, I wanted that for him real bad.  He also picked up two additional trophies as the co-producer with Tony Brown.  The five nominations he received this year lengthened Strait's record-holding total for CMA nominations to 83.  Cool cat Tony Brown joined George on his strolls up to the stage as he received his trophies.  They are a winning combination, in more ways then one.

George thanked the CMA, his record label MCA, Country Radio, and he ended his speech by thanking his fans.
"All you fans, you're the greatest. Everybody says they've got the greatest fans. Well, I really got the greatest fans. Thank you very much."




Congratulations George, you deserved it.  With that rich buttery baritone that is so comforting, and warm, I will always feel that you deserve Male Vocalist every year.  Nobody compares to you when it comes to interpretation, clarity, and vocal charisma.  You have been and always will be my Entertainer of the Year. 

George, leave it to you to record in Buffett’s little ol’ crab shack in the keys, and produce two outstanding Albums of the Year as a result.  As always, with you less is more.

-  Linda Robbins, aka Straitfever


TEXAS TROUBADOUR
Troubadour 

by  Monty Holmes and Leslie Satcher,
     as recorded by George Strait;
 

I still feel twenty-five
most of the time
I still raise a little cain with the boys.
Honky-tonks and pretty women,
Lord I'm still right there with 'em
Singin' above the crowd and the noise.

(Chorus)
Sometimes I feel like Jesse James,
Still trying to make a name.
Knowing nothin's gonna change
What I am.

I was a young troubadour,
when I rode in on a song.
and I'll be an old troubadour,
when I'm gone.

Well, The truth about a mirror
It's that a damned old mirror
Don't really tell the whole truth.
It don't show what's deep inside
Or read between the lines,
and it's really no reflection of my youth.

Sometimes I feel like Jesse James,
Still trying to make a name.
Knowing nothin's gonna change
What I am.

I was a young troubadour,
when I rode in on a song.
and I'll be an old troubadour
when I'm gone.
I'll be an old troubadour,
when I'm gone.

'TROUBADOUR'  is CMA Album of the Year

Nashville, TN---Nov.  13th, 2008

George Strait wowed the crowd in his stylish black coat as he debuted his new single 'River of Love' at the 42nd Annual CMA Awards Show broadcast on ABC Television.

In addition to debuting his new single, StraIt was honored with the CMA's Single of the Year Award for his mega hit 'I Saw God Today' and the CMA Album of the Year Award for 'Troubadour'. In addition to receiving two trophies for the two awards, Strait also picked up two additional trophies as the co-producer with Tony Brown.

It was a big night for Strait who thanked his record label and radio for his success. In addition, Strait said 'Everybody always says they have the greatest fans.....but I really do'. George Strait now has a total of 75 CMA nominations and has received a historic high of 22 awards

George Strait, The King of Country Music, has more #1 hits in a single chart format than any other recording artist, including all genres of music.  He has sold more than 68 million records, garnering him 32 different platinum or multi-platinum albums resulting in the most RIAA  platinum certification in country music, and the third in all genres, behind only The Beatles and Elvis Presley.  His current album, Troubadour, is certified gold, soon to become platinum.





GEORGE STRAIT GETS 57TH #1 SINGLE


River Of Love Reaches The Top of The R&R Chart


On the same day that George Strait was honored with the “Artist of the Decade” Award by the Academy of Country Music, the legendary King of Country Music reached the pinnacle of the country singles chart for the 57th time. “River of Love” added another milestone to Strait’s incredible career which shows no indication of slowing down.

The song was written for Strait by Dennis Morgan, Billy Burnette and Shawn Kemp and is the third release and second Number 1 single from his Grammy Award winning CD “Troubadour”. His previous #1 single from the current CD was “I Saw God Today” which has been nominated for a Dove award. 
In my opinion, the finest from George Strait; this is my favorite single, album, and video that George has ever done.   His vocals and voice are superb, and the emotion is tangible.   "Troubadour" the song is George Strait. 
STRAITFEVER HOME
GO TO:

George is interviewed about the making of "Troubadour."
Video Interview added.